Posted in Tips for Young Writers

Grammar Woes

On Monday I revealed that I sprinkle commas through my work like Peter Pan sprinkled around pixie dust. Today I’m going to talk about that a little more. I am not, however, going to give you a grammar lesson. Why? Because I am BAD at grammar and punctuation.

Despite being an Indonesian language teacher.

Despite having taught English in the past.

Despite being a professional writer.

We all need to know our strengths and weaknesses. Grammar and punctuation is not one of my strengths. But, I still have four tips to share when it comes to this confusing and aggravating, but essential, element of writing.

  • Study up

I struggle with grammar and punctuation, but some people live for it. I’m not talking about your friend who corrects you while your speaking to her. I’m talking about people who run blogs full of helpful, thoughtful and clear explanations of not only when to use certain punctuation but why you would use it then. For example, did you know that you need a ‘comma’ when you use a conjunction to join to complete sentences? I didn’t, but heaps of other lovely people did so now I do.

  • Treat the spelling and grammar check in your word processor with suspicion

It’s no surprise to anyone that technology is fallible. That’s why we back everything up to the cloud now-a-days (and a floppy disk when I was young. About a thousand years ago). Don’t just accept Word (or your writing tool of choice’s) suggestions. Read them, consider if you think they’re correct and, if in doubt, google that grammar or punctuation rule. A computer cannot tell the difference between ‘right’ and ‘write’ or between ‘grammar is fun.’ and ‘grammar is fun?’.

  • Grammar and punctuation only count when someone else is going to read your work

If you’re not handing your work into a teacher, passing it along to a beta-reader, or sending it to a publisher then don’t get bogged down in the details. Write your story, round out your characters, create a climax to die for THEN worry about where your full-stops and commas go.

  • Voice is more important than correct grammar.

Others might disagree with me, but I believe it’s more important for your character to have an authentic voice then be grammatically correct. For example, I find it hard to believe that many adults, let alone a teenage boy or girl, would say, “Whom are you going to believe?” rather than, “Who are you going to believe?”. How we speak is often a clue to our upbringing, social-economic status and level of education. The truth is, we don’t all speak proper and we don’t all speak proper all of the time.

I hate grammar and punctuation, but it’s something I just have to put up with. If you’re like me, I hope my few tips of how I survive it helps ease your journey a little. And if you’re a grammar pedant, keep your corrections to yourself.

Author:

I write young adult novels and have a passion for reading and writing. My blog is a place were young adult writers can get tips to improve their own writing so that they too can share their stories with the world. I'm a wife to a wonderful husband and mum to two beautiful boys.

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