Posted in Blog

KidLitVic 2019

I have been all over the place for the last couple of weeks, doing chores, finding out why our cat is pooing in inappropriate places and getting ready for KidLitVic2019. Luckily for you, this post is about that conference and not about the cat’s new toilet habits.

This is the fourth year that I’ve been to KidLitVic and it never fails to leave me energised, enthusiastic and wiser. This year, as with last year, it was held in the beautiful Melbourne Town Hall. There’s something so inspiring about a building that is both old and beautiful. There were a number of different panels, manuscript assessments from publishers, master classes run by publishers and, for the first time, up close and personal groups (which I didn’t do this year, but might if they’re available next year).

The best part of the conference, for me, is meeting other writers and for this reason alone I would encourage you to attend a writing conference. Meeting other people who are on the same journey as you, each at various stages of that journey, is exhilarating. Meeting people who know what you are talking about when you mention your manuscript, your hook, your saggy middle or anti-climax-of-a-climax is a relief.

It’s not an exaggeration to say that the writing community is one of the most open, friendly and welcoming communities I have ever come across. I have yet to meet a writer (or publisher for that matter) who wasn’t warm, enthusiastic and generous with their time and knowledge. What’s more, being surrounded by that makes it easy to be generous with your own time and knowledge.

Conferences can be expensive but they’re worth saving for. If you really don’t have the money to put towards something like a conference (and let’s face it, it’s not just the conference but travel, food and sometimes accommodation you have to factor in), then consider being a volunteer. While you will be working, you will still be able to listen in on panel discussions and mingle with other writers and publishers through out the day.

Writing itself is a solo occupation for most of us, but being a writer doesn’t have to be and conferences are definitely a great place to reconnect with your writing community.

Posted in Tips for Young Writers

Writing Conferences for Young Writers and KidLitVic2018

KidLitVic is happening this Saturday. It’s a conference specifically for writer’s of children’s and YA books, as well as illustrators. It began in 2016 and I’ve had the opportunity both previous conferences.

I love this conference. It’s a chance to learn new things, meet new people and have my work assessed by those in the industry. It also reminds me that, even though I’m not yet published, what I do is a legitimate career.

Until KidLitVic came up, I didn’t really know very much about writing conferences. Maybe that’s something I would have learnt about had I done a creative writing degree or the like, but I haven’t and so I didn’t attend my first conference until I was 32.

The thing is though, if you’re a young writer, you don’t have to wait. There are workshops and conferences out there specifically for young adults who write. All you need to do is hit Google to find them. For example, Writers Victoria offers workshops and information for young writers (disclaimer – I am a member of Writers Victoria).

If you do attend a conference, I suggest taking a pen, a notebook and an open mind. You never know who you’ll meet, or what you’ll learn. And don’t think that being young is a barrier, because it’s definitely not.

giphy

Have you attended a conference or workshop? What did you think?

Everyone has an opinion