Posted in Tips for Young Writers

Time Management

I’ve written about time management before. There’s no end of ideas out there about how to get more out of your time. So many in fact that I know in writing this I’m adding to the din, but I’ve been trying something new and it’s been working for me. Really, honestly, working for me.

A month ago, I decided that I needed to up my game. Not just in my writing career but in my personal life. In classic Wendy style I headed to the library and picked up a few books. I read them all and settled on the one that really stood out for me, The Five Choices of Extraordinary Productivity from Franklin Covey. I mean the name says it all. Five choices. I make a load of choices every day, I can add another five.

The five choices are:

  1. Act on the important, don’t react to the urgent
  2. Go for the extraordinary, don’t settle for the ordinary
  3. Schedule the big rocks, don’t sort the gravel
  4. Rule your technology, don’t let it rule you
  5. Fuel your fire, don’t burn out

I’m not going to summarise the entire book because there’s so much in it. I do encourage you to check it out, because time management can make a huge difference to finding time to write.

For me, acting on the important (writing, spending time with my kids, calling a friend) rather than being distracted by the urgent (what Jennifer Aniston looks like now, reorganising the spice-rack) has being really helpful. I’m very much a ‘oh, shiny’ sort of person and while that means I notice things that others don’t, it also means that I’m pulled away from meaningful tasks more than I like.

Scheduling those things that are important and getting them done, rather than drowning in the mess of things that “need” doing has also really helped me. In the book they say the first step is to identify if something is important or meaningful, and then to put it into one of four categories – either it’s a task (and goes on a list), an appointment (and goes in your diary), a contact (and is added to your contacts) or a note (and is filed with other notes for easy access).

I’m still working on getting a handle on my technology, but I have to say that I’ve managed to organise my inbox which is really the modern-day equivalent of climbing Everest (I bet all those mountain climbers have overflowing inboxes).

I’m certainly not saying this is the only or best system out there, but it’s a system that I’ve found easy to implement. As with all time-management systems, there is an element of discipline at play. While I’ schedule a walk at 11:30, it’s still up to me to make sure I take it. That said, if you’re finding it difficult to find time to write, it might be worth looking into. And it’s a fairly easy read, so you could probably read it and watch TV at the same time.

Don’t be fooled. There’s always time for TV.

Posted in Tips for Young Writers

Early Bird or Night Owl – Use it to Your Advantage

I think I’ve mentioned that I’m a morning person. I have always been a morning person, even when I was a moody teenager. In fact, when I was completing my last year at school I got up at 5am, six days a week, to study.

My mum on the other hand refers to herself as a night owl. For years she had to drag herself out of bed early to get us ready for the day and off to school but, once we grew up, she was able to slip into her natural rhythm. She may get up later than me, but she is still good to go when I’m dying to curl up and go to sleep.

What’s this got to do with you?

Working out where you fit on the ‘early-bird-nigh-owl’ continuum can make a huge difference to getting the most out of your writing. Especially if you’re trying to balance writing with other aspects of your life like school, university or work. If you have no issues with bouncing out of bed at 5am, you might as well use that to your advantage. Equally, if you get your second wind around 7pm, why wouldn’t you put some hours into your passion?

Don’t get sucked into the idea that one way of working is inherently better than the other. While we might have built ‘morning people’ up (the early bird gets the worm or early to rise make a man healthy, wealthy and wise), there’s nothing ‘better’ about being able to function well in the morning as opposed to the evening. What’s important is that we play to our strengths, not force ourselves into someone else’s idea of ‘good’.

Why not have a think about when you function best and put it to work for you, and your writing.

Posted in Blog

The Balancing Act

We all have different pulls on our time. For me, I have two children (aged 4 and 6), a husband (although he’s pretty self-sufficient it’s nice to actually spend time with him), a writing career that I’m trying to get started, family, friends, neighbours, chores, pets, hobbies, a ‘to-read’ pile. You might have all these and more. The fact is, we all need to balance our lives otherwise we end up overwhelmed and under-satisfied.

Continue reading “The Balancing Act”